Boston Marathon 2018 – Goals

Boston Marathon 2018 – Goals

Holy cow, it is less than two weeks until the 122nd running of the Boston Marathon. Yikes! My fourth time running the historic course. I like to set goals each year and sharing them here gives me a chance to look back and see if I hit them or missed them. In 2017, I set some pretty lofty goals. You can read them here. But here are the highlights/lowlights and how I fared.

GOAL A: Sub 2:55:00 – FAIL
GOAL B: Sub 3:00:00 – FAIL
GOAL C: BQ time (3:10-3:15) – SUCCESS 
MIRACLE GOAL: Sub 2:46:00 – FAIL

Actual time was 3:14:35 so I just squeaked by in Boston Qualifying time. Luckily I already had a better time under my belt to get me into the 2018 Boston Marathon because the 25 second cushion was not enough. It was hot last year at Boston. I was doing great until about midway through then all my energy got zapped. It turned into a long day.

Guess what my goals for 2018 are.

GOAL A: Sub 2:55:00
GOAL B: Sub 3:00:00
GOAL C: BQ time (3:10-3:15)
MIRACLE GOAL: Sub 2:46:00

Yes, I am persistent. But I think I can do it. Why am I more confident this year? I have a fast running buddy in my corral! Mario Zuniga and I have ran big races together and we push each other to new PR’s almost every time. Maybe Tom Thomas will jump back a corral and join us for a sub-3:00 push.

So there it is. My goal list for 2018. Hopefully I can recap with some green SUCCESS statuses beside each.

 

 

I hope you had a Goodr Easter!

I hope you had a Goodr Easter!

I received a really cool package on my doorstep the other day. As soon as I saw the shipping address, I thought “this is going to be AWESOME!” Inside the box were four Easter eggs. Each egg – or as they called them, “Flamingo Eggs” – had a pair of the new Easter Bunny Sunnies style sunglasses from Goodr in it. They sent these fun eggs to their brand ambassadors all over the country. Our job: hide the eggs on our favorite running trail. They also requested us to be creative and share photos on Instagram, Twitter and Facebook. We just had to hide them Easter morning and hope runners would find them.

 

So I got up early, dressed in my Easter finest and hit the trail with my wife, Jen, in tow on her bike to capture the shenanigans. I deposited all 4 eggs and returned home in time to hide Connor and Cole’s eggs inside and outside of the house before they awoke. Pictures started to come in from all of the ambassadors participating in their egg hiding adventures and of the lucky runners that stumbled upon the eggs.

 

 

Local runners Becky and Katie were lucky enough to snag two of the eggs I hid. The other two eggs were not there when I went back out later in the day for a run, but I have not heard or seen who the fortunate runners were.

 

 

What a fun way to start Easter and share the awesomeness of Goodr running sunglasses and then have fun with my family!

 

Next up – Yeti 100 miler. Yikes!

Next up – Yeti 100 miler. Yikes!

have been holding off on posting much about the big race I have coming up at the end of September. I just finished running the Kauai Marathon on the 3rd. I didn’t want to overshadow that race with a race of mythical proportions; the Yeti 100 Miler.

I saw the Yeti 100 pop up on my newsfeed one day and thought, “A 100 miler. Sounds fun! And crazy.” I shared the race shortly after and got a response of “If you do it, I will, too” from my buddy Josh. Would I really do it? Let’s check out the registration. Closed. Darn. Maybe next year. Sorry, Josh.

Whew.

I was a bit relieved. I mean, seriously, 100 miles. Crazy. 50 miles hurt bad enough.

Well, maybe I am a little crazy. Let’s email the race director and see if I can get Josh and I at least on the waiting list. I didn’t want to let Josh down, right? Although he did admit he, too, was relieved when he found out it was closed. What harm would it do to get on the waiting list?

A week later, an email arrived with a link to register. Jason, the race director, had pushed us through and we could run the race.

Horray!

Oh, no!

We are in … yikes.

So here we are with the Yeti looming in the bushes, waiting for us on September 29th in Abbingdon, Virginia.

Like most ultra marathons of the 100 mile variety, a belt buckle is the coveted prize. The Yeti buckle is adorned with a hairy sasquatch, majestic unicorn, a rainbow, pot of gold and a train. It can’t get much cooler than that.

Buckle photo

Unless …

… you “call your shot”. If you publically announce that you will run the 100 miles in less than 24 hours, you get a special hand-painted buckle. If you finish in 24:00:01 or slower, you go home empty handed. No special buckle. No regular buckle. No participant ribbon. Nothing.

Of course, two minutes after the announcement of the “Call your shot” challenge, Josh and I were messaging back and forth, “If you do it, I will”. Sounds a lot like conversations I had as a kid that ended up getting me grounded for a month.

We accepted the challenge.

Then this past week, I doubled-down on the “shot called”.

PIC of facebook post

Training has gone well. Our plans of doing 50+ mile training runs, 24 hour practice runs, sleep deprivation practice and night runs never came to fruition. We did manage to squeeze in a 30+ mile training run. We didn’t die or kill each other, so that counts as a success. And I have broken my record for most miles in a month these past two. So we are at least kind of prepared.

I think.

I hope.

My wife and Team Running Dad are coming along to cheer Josh and I on and help pace us for the long out-and-back-and-back-out-again course. The race runs along the Virginia Creeper Trail, named after a train that used to meander through Abbingdon, Domascus and White Top. There are over 100 trestle bridge crossings along the way. The surface is a mixed gravel and packed cinders substrate. Not technical like portions of the JFK 50 that I have run the past couple years. Hopefully this will be conducive to a sub-24 hour effort on our parts.

100 miles. Yikes. But that buckle …

RIT
goodr Sunglasses

Eternal Endurance
Shenandoah Valley Runners
Roots & Rocks Adventures
RUNaissance Mom

The Yeti 100. What the hell were we thinking?

The Yeti 100. What the hell were we thinking?

I have been holding off on posting much about the big race I have coming up next week. I just finished running the Kauai Marathon on September 3rd. I didn’t want to overshadow that race with a race of mythical proportions; the Yeti 100 Miler.

I saw the Yeti 100 pop up on my newsfeed one day and thought, “A 100 miler. Sounds fun! And crazy.” I shared the race shortly after and got a response of “If you do it, I will, too” from my buddy Josh. Would I really do it? Let’s check out the registration. Closed. Darn. Maybe next year. Sorry, Josh.

Whew.

I was a bit relieved. I mean, seriously, 100 miles. Crazy. 50 miles hurt bad enough.

Well, maybe I am a little crazy. Let’s email the race director and see if I can get Josh and I at least on the waiting list. I didn’t want to let Josh down, right? Although he did admit he, too, was relieved when he found out it was closed. What harm would it do to get on the waiting list?

A week later, an email arrived with a link to register. Jason, the race director, had pushed us through and we could run the race.

Hooray!

Oh, #%!&! 

We are in … yikes.

So here we are with the Yeti looming in the bushes, waiting for us on September 29th in Abingdon, Virginia.

Like most ultra marathons of the 100 mile variety, a belt buckle is the coveted prize. The Yeti buckle is adorned with a hairy sasquatch, majestic unicorn, a rainbow, pot of gold and a train. It can’t get much cooler than that.

From Yeti Trail Runners Facebook page. Note the different buckles …

Unless …

… you “call your shot”. If you publicly announce that you will run the 100 miles in less than 24 hours, you get a special hand-painted buckle. If you finish in 24:00:01 or slower, you go home empty handed. No special buckle. No regular buckle. No participant ribbon. Nothing.

Of course, two minutes after the announcement of the “Call your shot” challenge, Josh and I were messaging back and forth, “If you do it, I will”. Sounds a lot like conversations I had as a kid that ended up getting me grounded for a month.

We accepted the challenge.

Then this past week, I doubled-down on the “shot called”.

Training has gone well. Our plans of doing 50+ mile training runs, 24 hour practice runs, sleep deprivation practice and night runs never came to fruition. We did manage to squeeze in a 30+ mile training run. We didn’t die or kill each other, so that counts as a success. And I have broken my record for most miles in a month these past two. So we are at least kind of prepared.

I think.

I hope.

We have a great support team coming along to cheer us on and help pace us for the long out-and-back-and-back-out-again course. The race runs along the Virginia Creeper Trail, named after a train that used to meander through Abingdon, Damascus and White Top. There are over 100 trestle bridge crossings along the way. The surface is a mixed gravel and packed cinders substrate. Not technical like portions of the JFK 50 that I have run the past couple years. Hopefully this will be conducive to a sub-24 hour effort on our parts.

100 miles.

Yikes.

But that buckle …

RIT
goodr Sunglasses

Eternal Endurance
Shenandoah Valley Runners
Roots & Rocks Adventures
RUNaissance Mom

Race Recap – Kauai Marathon 2017

Race Recap – Kauai Marathon 2017

Quick Kauai marathon recap: Jen and I arrived in Kauai Friday evening at 7:30 Hawaii time, 1:30 home time. We set our alarm for early the next morning to do a group shakeout run with Bart Yasso. The run was at the Hyatt which is where the expo was located as well. There was also a Keikie Run (kids run) at the Hyatt that I knew Michael Wardian’s, my running idol, boys would be running. Unbeknownst to me, Jen had emailed Mike and arranged for us all to get together after the kids run for a bite to eat. After the fun run with Bart, we watched the kids run and met up with the Wardian family. 

We all went to the expo to get our race packets and then headed to Living Market for brunch. We sat and talked race strategies. Mike had run Kauai 3 times prior to this year, placing 1st, 2nd and 3rd. His goal was 2:20-2:30. Mine was 2:50-3:10. It was surreal sitting and talking about running with one of the top runners in the world. His wife and kids were really cool, too, and we all enjoyed just relaxing and chatting. This was definitely an experience I won’t forget.

Fast forward to race day. Jen and I walked to the start from our hotel. The stars were out (5AM) and the roosters were starting to crow. I somehow ended up at the front of the line heading to the start lead by traditionally dressed Hawaiians. I lined up near the front, and ended up bumping into another local runner, Karsten Brown. Yasso walked by and I got a high five. Mike Wardian lined up in front of me and we wished each other luck before the gun went off. 

I hit my goal paces for the beginning miles of the race. There is a point in the race where marathoners go right, half marathoners go left. At the first aid station after the split, I asked how many runners were in front of me. Just one, they informed me. What? Second behind Wardian? Wow! I continued running a decent pace, slowed by hills but on track on the flats and downhills. After a big climb from miles 14 to 18, the hills gave way to a stunning vista overlooking the ocean. I hit mile 20 with the prospect of a podium finish a strong possibility. Then things got a little fuzzy. The shaded roads gave way to more sun exposed running. Temps were in the mid 80s and I was feeling it. It seemed like every downhill had a tough uphill. My steady pace turned into a walk. I was soon passed by a speedy girl and then another guy. Maybe I could hang on for a male podium finish. Nope. The wheels completely fell off and I hoped to make it to the finish without passing out on a roadside ditch. 

I finally crossed the line at 3:32 in 6th place. Not my best. Not my worst. After a few beers and a ton of potato chips, I returned to the land of the living and enjoyed a nice post race party. I earned 3rd in my age group. Wardian took first overall at 2:45.

I thoroughly enjoyed the first 20 miles of the race and the pre and post race activities. I’d like to forget those miles at the end, but overall, a great destination race. I’d highly recommend this race. Nicely organized and the scenery was breathtaking. 

Now it is time to recover with my butt in the sand and a drink in my hand.